how long should i be sleeping for weight lose. sleep

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Think You know how to make Sense of Sleeping? Think again

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Beauty In Line
Beauty in Line was created in mind to empower the idea of holistic beauty. Body & Mind. Give you the knowledge and choice of treatments in your city. Keep yourself up to date with current events, timeless self-care, new tech in beauty, wellness and fitness.

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Does everybody dreams?

Do you think you don’t dream? Because you do not remember your dreams. Even nightmares never wake you up.
Or quite the opposite? You are a constant dreamer. You dream all types of dreams, often.
Everybody has dreams, even if you don’t remember them.
Everybody knows that sleep has a huge influence on your life and health. If you do not sleep often enough, you are less creative, tired, easily distracted. But not many know that how you snooze terribly affect your health.

There are loads of misconceptions and myths around this topic. Should we sleep 8? maybe 6 is enough? For sure, it’s not important how I sleep… how it could influence? How?

You know that you have dreams in REM phase. It allows us to learn new things and abilities and develop creativity. It also helps in problem-solving and restores our emotions. Exactly heals your emotional wounds.
What is against common beliefs, according to new research, peoples’ dreams don’t reflect on the events of current day. Neither thoughts you think before falling asleep. Instead, dreams reflect feelings from the previous day.
What does it mean to you? This indicates that when dreaming, your brain is attempting to separate emotions from events and experiences. Because the stress hormone noradrenaline is absent during REM, dream sleep is particularly effective at separating experiences from feelings. What helps people to get over emotional wounds better. How? By re-experiencing emotions in dream sleep without mentioned hormone.

pexels-cottonbro-women-sleep

Source: Cottonbro | Pexels

laura-chouette-sleep-pillow-unsplash

Source: Laura Chouette | Unsplash

First sleeping factor

Many things influence how your body prepares to sleep and wake up. Your body has an internal “body clock”  a 24-hour repeating rhythm (called the circadian rhythm). It regulates when you’re awake and when it’s time to sleep for you.

Something called adenosine (ah-DEN-o-seen) is a factor linked to this drive for sleep. Adenosine levels in the brain keep going up when you’re awake. The rise indicates a shift to sleep. And finally, adenosine is broken down by your body while you sleep.

Second Sleeping factor

The second factor working with your ‘body clock’ is in tune with natural stimuli like light, darkness, and other cues to help determine when you feel awake or sleepy.

Your body clock regulates releases hormone called melatonin (mel-ah-TONE-in). Melatonin makes you feel tired, and this signalling to your body that it’s time to sleep.

Because of this, you hear all this fuss about cutting out TV screen, smartphone, computer in the evening. Bright artificial light often called Blue light, can disturb melatonin production.

In the morning, your body releases cortisol (KOR-tih-sol), which helps your body wake up naturally.

pexels-vlada-karpovich-sleep-bedroom-duve

Source: Laura Chouette | Pexels

pexels elvira gibadullina teen girl sleep bed 1 scaled

Source: Elvira Gibadullina | Pexels

Why teens insist on going late to bed?

The timing of your body clock change with age. That’s why teenagers naturally fall asleep later at night compared to adults. In their body, melatonin is released and tops later in the 24-hour cycle than in the adult body. It’s normal that teens prefer later bedtimes and sleep-in in the morning.
So you do not need to be mad about that.
Generally speaking:
Early evening is when kids sleep the most.
Teenagers have a preference toward sleeping in the morning as well as going to sleep late.
Older people have a tendency to prepare earlier to sleep and wake up early.

 


Does only time change as people adult?
All pattern of sleep is fluctuating during life.
Infants spend more time in REM.
Then in early childhood, it starts the time when non-REM sleep appears—called slow-wave sleep.
After puberty, occur a noticeable drop in the amount of non-REM sleep—that decrease with age more and more.

 Sleep regulates your hormonal balance, especially the balance between Ghrelin – a hormone that makes you feel hungry and Leptin – which brings a feeling of being full. When you constantly are under sleep deprivation: Ghrelin is shutting up, and your Leptin level is decreasing. That’s why you feel more hungry when you lack of sleep.
On top of that, sleep influence your insulin response. Insulin helps Control Blood Glucose Levels (sugar level). So when you miss out on your nightly rest, the sugar level in your blood can be higher, as well as the risk for diabetes.

 There are many studies about obesity, hormonal issues and from some time about sleep influencing human body. 

Lack of sleep increases the risk of obesity. Studies convey on 66,817 adults measuring dependence between sleep duration and overweight shows that sleeping less than 5h and more than 9h increase chances of obesity.  Optimal sleep duration from a perspective of weight is 7h to 8h what confirms many other research as this one from Harvard – Obesity Prevention 

 

How lack of sleep makes you fat

autri taheri women bed douve unsplash scaled

Source: Autri Taheri | Unsplash

Healthy Sleep Tips

6 proven tips to sleep better

Source: Beauty in Line

milada vigerova book cat bedtime night routine unsplash

Source: Milada Vigerova | Unsplash

 

01. You need to have time for yourself… if not, you will take it by procrastination and methods like ‘revenge bedtime procrastination’. Where you are mindlessly scrolling your social media, watching Netflix, organising house – basically, everything just to not go to sleep. Of course, it’s nothing you do intentionally. It just … happens. And you find yourself at 3 am with eyes wide open and trouble to sleep

02. Do something mentally and physically stimulating. That does not need to be the same thing.

During the day, do something to challenge your mind, do something new or different – break the habit. It will not only make you more tired in the evening, but will boost your brain capacity. Add to that physical exercise that burns some of the energy stored in your body after a day of working. It will relax you and keep your body healthier. Not to mention you will fall asleep easier.

03. Create a sort of bedtime routine. It may sound boring, but does not have to. Winding down is a critical stage. Luckily, you will find many ways to relax, in the world out of sofa and social media. Think about what you like first, and then how you can do it in a relaxing, healthy way.
Fan of music? Look for one that is not too heavy and without sad lyrics. Try new kinds. Instrumental music is great, sounds of nature, light jazz… it sounds different than you may usually do, but that’s the point. Read a book. Do some stretching or breathing exercise. Do you know that there is a whole type of yoga dedicated to… sleep? It’s called Yoga Nidra, and you literally are lying the whole session on the mat. Does it sound good?
If you struggle with a busy mind, pick up a ‘to do list’ or freestyle writing where you through all the thoughts on paper in any form you like. It helps to organise thoughts as well as with the feeling of misunderstooding or omitting.
Just like learning any new skill, relaxation takes practice.
04. That’s the easy one. Make your sleeping zone cosy, dark, quiet, and neat, with a temperature range of 18 to 24 Celsius degrees. Open the windows for 15min before you prepare to bed.
05. Your body is in tune with natural stimuli like light, darkness, and other cues to help determine when you feel awake or sleepy. It’s why you should imitate those types of stimuli. Take care to have loads of light during the day and gradually dim them through the evening.
06. It’s better to sleep in a colder room undercover than the opposite. Body, as well as bedroom temperature, affect sleep more than noise.

 

Does everybody dreams?

Do you think you don’t dream? Because you do not remember your dreams. Even nightmares never wake you up.
Or quite the opposite? You are a constant dreamer. You dream all types of dreams, often.
Everybody has dreams, even if you don’t remember them.
Everybody knows that sleep has a huge influence on your life and health. If you do not sleep often enough, you are less creative, tired, easily distracted. But not many know that how you snooze terribly affect your health.

There are loads of misconceptions and myths around this topic. Should we sleep 8? maybe 6 is enough? For sure, it’s not important how I sleep… how it could influence? How?

You know that you have dreams in REM phase. It allows us to learn new things and abilities and develop creativity. It also helps in problem-solving and restores our emotions. Exactly heals your emotional wounds.
What is against common beliefs, according to new research, peoples’ dreams don’t reflect on the events of current day. Neither thoughts you think before falling asleep. Instead, dreams reflect feelings from the previous day.
What does it mean to you? This indicates that when dreaming, your brain is attempting to separate emotions from events and experiences. Because the stress hormone noradrenaline is absent during REM, dream sleep is particularly effective at separating experiences from feelings. What helps people to get over emotional wounds better. How? By re-experiencing emotions in dream sleep without mentioned hormone.

pexels-cottonbro-women-sleep

Source: Cottonbro | Pexels

laura-chouette-sleep-pillow-unsplash

Source: Laura Chouette | Unsplash

First sleeping factor

Many things influence how your body prepares to sleep and wake up. Your body has an internal “body clock”  a 24-hour repeating rhythm (called the circadian rhythm). It regulates when you’re awake and when it’s time to sleep for you.

Something called adenosine (ah-DEN-o-seen) is a factor linked to this drive for sleep. Adenosine levels in the brain keep going up when you’re awake. The rise indicates a shift to sleep. And finally, adenosine is broken down by your body while you sleep.

Second Sleeping factor

The second factor working with your ‘body clock’ is in tune with natural stimuli like light, darkness, and other cues to help determine when you feel awake or sleepy.

Your body clock regulates releases hormone called melatonin (mel-ah-TONE-in). Melatonin makes you feel tired, and this signalling to your body that it’s time to sleep.

Because of this, you hear all this fuss about cutting out TV screen, smartphone, computer in the evening. Bright artificial light often called Blue light, can disturb melatonin production.

In the morning, your body releases cortisol (KOR-tih-sol), which helps your body wake up naturally.

pexels-vlada-karpovich-sleep-bedroom-duve

Source: Laura Chouette | Pexels

pexels elvira gibadullina teen girl sleep bed 1 scaled

Source: Elvira Gibadullina | Pexels

Why teens insist on going late to bed?

The timing of your body clock change with age. That’s why teenagers naturally fall asleep later at night compared to adults. In their body, melatonin is released and tops later in the 24-hour cycle than in the adult body. It’s normal that teens prefer later bedtimes and sleep-in in the morning.
So you do not need to be mad about that.
Generally speaking:
Early evening is when kids sleep the most.
Teenagers have a preference toward sleeping in the morning as well as going to sleep late.
Older people have a tendency to prepare earlier to sleep and wake up early.

 


Does only time change as people adult?
All pattern of sleep is fluctuating during life.
Infants spend more time in REM.
Then in early childhood, it starts the time when non-REM sleep appears—called slow-wave sleep.
After puberty, occur a noticeable drop in the amount of non-REM sleep—that decrease with age more and more.

 Sleep regulates your hormonal balance, especially the balance between Ghrelin – a hormone that makes you feel hungry and Leptin – which brings a feeling of being full. When you constantly are under sleep deprivation: Ghrelin is shutting up, and your Leptin level is decreasing. That’s why you feel more hungry when you lack of sleep.
On top of that, sleep influence your insulin response. Insulin helps Control Blood Glucose Levels (sugar level). So when you miss out on your nightly rest, the sugar level in your blood can be higher, as well as the risk for diabetes.

 There are many studies about obesity, hormonal issues and from some time about sleep influencing human body. 

Lack of sleep increases the risk of obesity. Studies convey on 66,817 adults measuring dependence between sleep duration and overweight shows that sleeping less than 5h and more than 9h increase chances of obesity.  Optimal sleep duration from a perspective of weight is 7h to 8h what confirms many other research as this one from Harvard – Obesity Prevention 

 

How lack of sleep makes you fat

autri taheri women bed douve unsplash scaled

Source: Autri Taheri | Unsplash

Healthy Sleep Tips

6 proven tips to sleep better

Source: Beauty in Line

milada vigerova book cat bedtime night routine unsplash

Source: Milada Vigerova | Unsplash

 

01. You need to have time for yourself… if not, you will take it by procrastination and methods like ‘revenge bedtime procrastination’. Where you are mindlessly scrolling your social media, watching Netflix, organising house – basically, everything just to not go to sleep. Of course, it’s nothing you do intentionally. It just … happens. And you find yourself at 3 am with eyes wide open and trouble to sleep

02. Do something mentally and physically stimulating. That does not need to be the same thing.

During the day, do something to challenge your mind, do something new or different – break the habit. It will not only make you more tired in the evening, but will boost your brain capacity. Add to that physical exercise that burns some of the energy stored in your body after a day of working. It will relax you and keep your body healthier. Not to mention you will fall asleep easier.

03. Create a sort of bedtime routine. It may sound boring, but does not have to. Winding down is a critical stage. Luckily, you will find many ways to relax, in the world out of sofa and social media. Think about what you like first, and then how you can do it in a relaxing, healthy way.
Fan of music? Look for one that is not too heavy and without sad lyrics. Try new kinds. Instrumental music is great, sounds of nature, light jazz… it sounds different than you may usually do, but that’s the point. Read a book. Do some stretching or breathing exercise. Do you know that there is a whole type of yoga dedicated to… sleep? It’s called Yoga Nidra, and you literally are lying the whole session on the mat. Does it sound good?
If you struggle with a busy mind, pick up a ‘to do list’ or freestyle writing where you through all the thoughts on paper in any form you like. It helps to organise thoughts as well as with the feeling of misunderstooding or omitting.
Just like learning any new skill, relaxation takes practice.
04. That’s the easy one. Make your sleeping zone cosy, dark, quiet, and neat, with a temperature range of 18 to 24 Celsius degrees. Open the windows for 15min before you prepare to bed.
05. Your body is in tune with natural stimuli like light, darkness, and other cues to help determine when you feel awake or sleepy. It’s why you should imitate those types of stimuli. Take care to have loads of light during the day and gradually dim them through the evening.
06. It’s better to sleep in a colder room undercover than the opposite. Body, as well as bedroom temperature, affect sleep more than noise.

 

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